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Subglottic Stenosis
Alyssa Keen

Alyssa came to Children’s Hospital in June of 2009 where she was treated for subglottic stenosis. A graft was done with a piece of cartilage from her ribs. Unfortunately it did not take and Aly ended up with a tracheotomy. Through all of this Aly remained strong and happy. She was a fighter. Considering she spent the first six months of her life in the NICU at other hospitals from being born premature. She never gave up. During her one month stay with Children’s she showed her strengths. She would enter the nurses’ station being pulled in her wagon and the nurses would all say "the queen has arrived." She would greet them with her wonderful smile and bright blue eyes. Although Aly was only 17 months old she showed more courage and a fighting spirit to survive than I have ever witnessed before. We lost Aly in August 2009 and want everyone to know the importance of "apnea monitors". When we were out of the hospital, Aly was put to bed for a nap by her care taker and was not placed on her apnea monitor. Somehow her trach came out. There were no alarms to warn us that she was in need of help. She was found by her mother with no pulse. She was revived and flown to Atlanta, but it was too late. She had been down to long and was pronounced brain dead. We took Aly off of all life support on August 20th and said goodbye to our little miracle. Please, please stress the importance of the Apnea monitors. Although they can be aggravating at times, it would have saved her life.
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